Honoring and Remembering the Navajo Code Talkers and Crazy Joe Romo – Airborne!

The Ole’ Buzzard’s preamble:  Someday we’ll tell the tale about Crazy Joe Romo … Navajo Blood, Radio Operator, Silver Star, Airborne, European Theatre, WWII, scarred, haunted and cursed by memories of the sound and fury of battle.  Joe was my friend, adopted big brother and fellow Radio Operator and Crew Member on WB-50 bombers from 1958-61.  When Joe’s coping failed, he turned to alcohol and did wild things that put him in front of Courts Martial boards that always seemed to recycle him back into the Service … minus his stripes of course.  Joe’s chest full of ribbons, his combat record, shined shoes and sharp uniform that we worked on together always helped to resuscitate him.   Joe was my hero and friend.  God bless you Joe wherever you are or went.  I’m sure it’s a special place reserved just for you and a Greatest Generation of your Airborne Brothers.

We turn now to honor Navajo Talkers …

Thomas H. Begay didn’t want to be a radio operator. In fact, up until he graduated from bootcamp, he thought he was going to become an aerial gunner for the Marine Corps during World War II.

“They sent me to a confidential area,” he said. “I walked in and there’s a whole bunch of Navajo.”

His previous MOS didn’t matter. Begay would attend code talking school.

The Navajo language had become the basis of a new code, and they were going to train to become code talkers. It was hard to see it then, but Begay and his fellow Navajo would help turn the tides of war and save countless lives.

An Unbreakable Code

The Code Talkers used native languages to send military messages before World War II. Choctaw, for example, was successfully used during World War I. But the Marine Corps needed an “unbreakable” code for its island-hopping campaign in the Pacific. Navajo, which was unwritten and known by few outside the tribe, seemed to fit the Corps’ requirements.

Twenty-nine Navajos were recruited to develop the code in 1942. They took their language and developed a “Type One Code” that assigned a Navajo word to each English letter. They also created special words for planes, ships and weapons.

But just because a person understood Navajo didn’t mean they could understand the code. While a person fluent in the language would hear a message that translated into a list of words that seemingly had no connection to each other, a code talker would hear a very clear message.

Here is an example:

Navajo Code: DIBEH, AH-NAH, A-SHIN, BE, AH-DEEL-TAHI, D-AH, NA-AS-TSO-SI, THAN-ZIE, TLO-CHIN

Translation: SHEEP, EYES, NOSE, DEER, BLOW UP, TEA, MOUSE, TURKEY, ONION

Deciphered Code: SEND DEMOLITION TEAM TO …

In addition to being unbreakable, the new code also reduced the amount of time it took to transmit and receive secret messages. Because all 17 pages of the Navajo code were memorized, there was no need to encrypt and decipher messages with the aid of coding machines. So, instead of taking several minutes to send and receive one message, Navajo code talkers could send several messages within seconds. This made the Navajo code talker an important part of any Marine unit.

On Iwo Jima

Begay did well in training and picked up the code quickly. A month after arriving at code talking school, he was given orders to his new unit and sent overseas.

“They told us we were going to Tokyo,” he said with a chuckle. “In February, we were told we’re supposed to land on Iwo Jima.”

On Feb. 19, 1945, at 0900 hours, Begay landed on the north side of the island with the 5th Marine Division. One code talker had already been killed during the first wave of attacks, and five more would be injured by the time the fighting stopped. In the face of machine gun fire and mortar rounds, Begay and his fellow Navajo Code Talkers continued to relay messages that were vital to the eventual victory on the island.

In all, nearly 800 coded messages were sent during the assault on Iwo Jima. There were zero mistakes.

“I was protected by the Marines,” Begay said. “They were protecting us; we were protecting them. I was lucky. But some didn’t get lucky – like those who got killed on the beach.”

Learn more about Thomas H. Begay here.

Author

Reynaldo Leal

– Reynaldo Leal is a public affairs officer for VA’s office of Digital Media Engagement and member for the VAntage Point’s staff. He is a proud Marine Corps Veteran who deployed to the Al Anbar Province with 3rd Battalion 5th Marine Regiment in 2004 and 2006. He also took part in some of the heaviest fighting during Operation Phantom Fury in 2004.

Reader’s Comment:

 Robert L. Primeaux    

I’m an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and what the code talkers from other Tribal Nations. My Uncle was a code talker in Europe during WWII, he passed away a number of years ago and he told me when I came back from Vietnam in 1970 that he never got any recognition for what he did as code talker. So, I feel it is unfair that only the Navajos get the recognition for speaking their language. The Pentagon and the VA better give other Tribal Nations the honor they deserve. Thank you.
Robert Primeaux
100% Disabled Vietnam Veteran

The Ole’ Buzzard

“There are a thousand hacking
 at the branches of evil to one 
who is striking at the root.”
H.D. Thoreau
Wayne L. Wickizer
Banned by UtahPolicy.com
5,000 flying hours USAF
Major, U.S. Army Special Forces Ret.
Former FBI Agent 1970-76
Retired Educator
Member Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ)
Freelance Commentator and Political “Lurker”
Skype = wwickizer1
Cell 435-828-0496
The only Agent in the history of the FBI
of “The Washington Merry-go-Round.”

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